Library for Peace

the library your mother warned you about

Currently closed due to

the Coronavirus.

If you have questions or to

make an appointment during

the week, please contact us at

299-9063 or email Karen at

kbauder@stfrancisumc.org.

Angels, Alcoholism, Aardvarks, Banned Books, Bible, Bigotry, Buddhism,

Children’s Library, Christianity, Comedies, Documentaries, Dragons, Dramas, DVDs, Eating Disorders, Faith, Fiction, Great Decisions Series, Greek, Hebrew, Hinduism, History Around the World, Humanism, Islam, Jesus, LGBTQ, Lost Book of the Bible, Lost Christianities, Mental Health, Mysticism, Native Americans, New age, New Testament, Novels, Philosophy, Poetry, Politics, Religion, Science, Short Stories, Social Justice, Spiritual Leaders, Spiritualism, Taoism, Wisdom, Zen. . . and many more!

 

Library for Peace Children’s Library

Reading is one of the most important activities that you can encourage your children to do. It’s entertaining, thought provoking,

and absolutely critical to success later in life.

Books in the

Library for Peace

to Talk About:

Throughout our lives we long to love ourselves more deeply and find a greater sense of connection with others. Our fear of intimacy—both with others and with ourselves—creates feelings of pain and longing. But these feelings can awaken in us the desire for freedom and the willingness to take up the spiritual path.

The Happiness Hypothesis is a book about ten Great Ideas. Each chapter is an attempt to savor one idea that has been discovered by several of the world's civilizations -- to question it in light of what we now know from scientific research, and to extract from it the lessons that still apply to our modern lives and illuminate the causes of human flourishing.

Everyone wants to be happy. But what does that really mean? Increasingly, scientific evidence shows us that true satisfaction and well-being come only from within.  Whether you are struggling with depression or simply want to feel happier, Dr. Weil's revolutionary approach will shift the paradigm of emotional health and help you achieve greater contentment in life.

 

Two spiritual giants. Five days. One timeless question.
 
Nobel Peace Prize Laureates His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu have survived more than fifty years of exile and the soul-crushing violence of oppression. Despite their hardships—or, as they would say, because of them—they are two of the most joyful people on the planet.

We Also

Recommend

Many people believe they can only be happy when their problems are solved, relationships improve, and goals are achieved. In this simple guide, Dr. Richard Carlson shows readers how to be happy right now - no matter the situation.

 

His plan, based on the principles of Thought (thoughts are voluntary, not involuntary); Mood (thinking is a voluntary that varies function varies from moment to moment and these variances are called moods); Separate Realities (everyone thinks in a unique way and lives in separate psychological realities); Feelings (feelings and emotions serve as a barometer for when one is "off-track" and headed for unhappiness); and the Present Moment (the only time when genuine contentment, satisfaction, and happiness).

 

This timeless book guides readers through life's challenges and restores the joy of living along the way.

On the Issue of

LGBTQ Rights in the United Methodist Church

This book is a challenge to mainline churches who, according to the author, are so preoccupied with debating the sinfulness of homosexuality that they are missing opportunities to pastor persons who have been turned off by religion. Waun tells her own story where she, as a pastor, became an “accidental advocate” for LBGT people by listening to stories of those who had been wounded by churches.

Within the liturgy, congregations pledge to accept, love, forgive, and nurture the newly baptized member. The church, however, often lives out this covenant selectively, forcing its gay and lesbian members into silence, alienation, and doubt. We Were Baptized Too challenges the church to take seriously its understanding of baptism and communion as a means of grace, justice, and liberation.

Reflecting a wide spectrum of religious tradition and spiritual paths--including Buddhist, Hindu, Pagan, 12-step, Christian and Jewish--over 30 contributors speak about the intersections of their faith practice and their bisexuality.

 

James Rutland Wood asserts that God is calling The United Methodist Church to a mission for which it is uniquely suited: to lead contemporary people and societies to a culturally aware biblical faith. Such a faith interprets the Bible in the light of the culture of its authors and watches for the living word the God of the Bible speaks to each person in his or her own culture. Fulfilling this mission will shape the way people access the Bible; the way the Bible informs public policy; and, specifically, the way people and societies accept gay and lesbian persons.

  • Facebook
  • YouTube
St Francis in the Foothills UMC             4625 E River Rd.           Tucson, AZ 85718            (520) 299-9063

© 2020 Melissa Mitchell & KKC Bauder